DT greenhorn learning from yt

Hey there :slight_smile:

this morning i had a crush on @aurelienpierre s yt howto ’ [EN] darktable 3.0 live - fast workflow for pros/time-constrained photographers’ https://youtu.be/vP5m1YmSRw8

and got this result:

20210109-134251_780_0075.NEF.xmp (19,3 KB)

20210109-134251_780_0075.NEF (17,8 MB)

This file is licensed Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike.

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Krita 4.4.2

A few days ago I started having a better look at Krita, basically to replace GIMP for my retouching and colour related stuff. In the process of getting familiar with it I noticed that Krita can import RAWs. So the above image is a Krita only edit with the, at the moment, limited few-days skills that I have using it :persevere:

Anyway: Thanks for sharing!

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20210109-134251_780_0075.NEF.xmp (12.2 KB)

someone’s place of comfort in a very dark and dingy environment?

Nice keep us posted on your journey of discovery

@priort:

I do hope it is clear that this was a for-fun 5 minute edit!

Although it does depend a bit on what one wants to do I wouldn’t recommend pulling RAWs straight into Krita. It is a digital painting and 2D animation editor first and foremost that has matured enough to also do serious retouch and colouring related stuff on digital photos.

If you are at all serious about your digital images you will pull them into a dedicated RAW editor first to get them ready for doing the artistic stuff in the likes of Krita.

Being able to pull RAWs into Krita is a nice feature though. Digital artist often use a photograph as side-by-side reference when creating, which is made a lot easier this way. I could also imagine that some people don’t particularly like the whole RAW editor thingy and want to jump straight into a more artistic way of editing, which you can do (as shown above).