One-liner challenge

#21

Here is a bash/gmic/ffmpeg combo move:

  • From a dir with images capture000000.jpgcapture000309.jpg
cp capture000000.jpg out000000.jpg ; prev=0 ; previous=0 ; counter=1 ; current=1 ; until [ $counter -gt 309 ] ; do current=$(echo 0000000$counter|tail -c 7) && prev=$((counter-1)) && previous=$(echo 0000000$prev|tail -c 7) && previous=$(echo 0000000$prev|tail -c 7) && gmic capture$(echo $current).jpg out$(echo $previous).jpg blend lighten -o out$(echo $current).jpg && ((counter++)) ; done && ffmpeg -framerate 48  -i out%06d.jpg -vcodec libx264 -s 1280x720 -preset slow -crf 5 -pix_fmt yuv420p  ~/Desktop/startrails1d.mkv

Well that was fun, but I imagine this can be done with a simpler gmic command.

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#22

Nice. :star:

Yes, gmic could totally do what you did with bash or, in the case of Windows, cmd.

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#23

I knew it! Alls I’m doing with bash is a two element accumulating sliding window, and making a 48 fps 720p mkv in ffmpeg.

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#24
gmic lights.jpg tic r2dx 750%,2 r2dx 7%,1 r2dx 525,1 chroma_afre .6 autoindex 16,1 toc n 0,255 round o lights.png

I only used resize. chroma_afre isn’t important. I just wanted to match the saturation with @Reptorian’s. With some more tweaking and adjustments, I am sure that @Reptorian can improve his filter.

lights

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