The 180-Euro-photo-series

Yes it seems many shots, including the one I cropped, were framed purposefully to capture cloud formations. However the natural inclination for many viewers is to take the sky for granted and look towards the ground. The most loved image in this series has lovely composition of the scenery, and hardly any sky.

Its easier for painters to draw the clouds just where they want them. We photographers need the wind and clouds to play nice for our compositions.

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I typically prefer no information up front. Let the images speak for themselves. But I did like her story.

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I agree with that in general. But @betazoid stated that she intends her images to be perceived in a certain manner (paintings), and so on that basis the feedback people give her can be more targeted if it considers her intent. And your previous post on this thread clearly did exactly that. :+1:

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Ah yes I understand where you are coming from now. I agree, for targeted feedback more information can be helpful.

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Hi, so thanks for the great feedback and discussion! This is so much better than Instagram, Flickr or 500px. I think I will post more often into the showcase category.
Actually I have 2 more photo series from this spring, Thayatal and Lainzer Tiergarten. But there are a few more shots from this series that I intend to share here.
@afre My next trips are planned for 2nd (Langbathseen) and 9th June (Ysperklamm), maybe with some other people, but I have the feeling that the dates are not going to “hold” because of the weather… So maybe next weekend I will make a “spontaneous” trip somewhere, if the weather is nice.

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Don’t do only good weather shootings, rain brings nice reflection, clouds and rainbows.

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probably it’s visible that some parts are corrected
it’s a panorama composed of 4 shots, the corners were missing
I worked the whole morning with this

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A woman cant hike and travel?
Bold sometimes near football stadiums…

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These 2 pictures (may 24) are for me better then these above.
Better a good picture with unusual ratio then “ratio first, picture must cope”

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Actually here is the thing: the last 2 were edited on my uncalibrated laptop, the others on my external wide gamut screen, the last 2 are in sRGB, the others maybe in medium gamut. All should look acceptable though if your screen is ok.
Thanks for the likes for those photos, btw.
Edit: I mean those two that were edited/added on May 24. The last one was edited today.

@Soupy Here is an example for a Ruisdael without hero tree. https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:Jacob_van_Ruisdael_-_Haerlempje_4731M09_7VMHQ.jpg Apparently there are quite a few of them. I rarely hear or read this term “hero tree”, though I admit, Ruisdael is not my research area (yet). I guess it’s a funny invention like “Rubens body”. I think we both think of the same Dutch landscape with hero tree, but I am a bit annoyed that I don’t find it on the internet. Or maybe it’s no Ruisdael afterall.

@afre @elGordo There is one significant difference between old landscape paintings and my landscapes: lens distortion. The space in my photos is actually quite a bit distorted, because I used an ultrawide lens. And I usually do no use lens distortion correction. I only activate it if the distortion is extremely disturbing. It’s part of my style. My photos are only supposed to remind of paintings, they are not supposed to look exactly like paintings.

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Yes not all of them have it. But if you type ‘Ruisdael painting’ into google images and scroll down you will see a lot. If you type in ‘Jan Both paintings’ - another Dutch landscape artist at the same time as Ruisdael - you will see even more. It’s not a rule, it just often works well for composition.

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Surround (light from room and window) and the lack of eye strain has such a huge impact on the viewing. I just viewed the photos after a nap and in the dark. As a result, they were sharper and higher in contrast. I could see more of the haloing around the edges. After opening the blackout blinds, the grittiness is about the right amount. Still a little strong for my taste. But can’t unsee the haloing.

@betazoid, I am curious what is your surround is when you edit.

I know, I also see them differently every time I look at them. Human perception is changing constantly. I am editing at daylight, the window faces to west. At the moment it’s cloudy. When the sun is shining I close the blinds.

However, I wonder what kind of screen you are using. I don’t see any disturbing/extreme halos, neither on my Benq SW240 nor on my phone.
In general, halos are more visible on small screens and if you are far away from a larger screen. If you are very close to a very large screen you see them less. But it also depends on the screen and it’s resolution.

I know, everybody will write now “I see the halos, there are halos”.