To all Swedish forumers

#1

Glöm inte att fira den stora dagen med en massipantåta!

Mvh
Claes i Lund

1 Like
(Morgan Hardwood) #2

Ah, dags att kalla mommo o moffa o famo o faffa.

#3

So, you Swedes, is this true?

#4

Looks like an inflated raviolo…

(Mica) #5

According to google translate, you’ve said “Don’t forget to celebrate the big day with a pantyhose!” which is interesting, if accurate.

#6

Daar kan ik geen chocola van maken.:grin:

1 Like
#7

“…what if Scandinavians are really weird?”

Oh no, we are the normal ones.

And no, that is not an inflated raviolo!
It is a princesstårta, having a coating of marcipan,
which has a special meaning for every Swede stemming
from the county Småland.

@paperdigits: No, not accurate.
https://www.facebook.com/fosstatossdanimass

#8

Ingemar Stenmark je bil dolga leta neuradni kralj Vojvodine Kranjske. In sploh ni bil slab kralj.

#9

Toda ali je užival marcipansko torto?

#10

Ja, le zato je premagal Lindsey Vonn, marcipan in melanholija švedske pokrajine.

#11

I also thought it was a giant ravioli with something written in BBQ sauce on top. Now I’m super hungry at 0200 hrs.

1 Like
#12

@Claes I sort of understand but could you elucidate sometime in the future?

(nosle) #13

Claes I have to say I have no idea what this is about! Perhaps its a southern* thing

*anywhere south of Örnsköldsvik 63.2883265" N

#14

Oh yes! It is really about county Småland, or rather: their dialect.
Because of that, The First Thursday in March has become the
National Day of Småland.

In the Småland dialect, the R-sound is inaudible in certain positions.
Ask my wife what comes after thirty-nine, and she will reply Foty
(or rather Fötti).

So, Fössta tosdan i mass is the day when you eat massipantåta.
In normal Swedish Första torsdan i mars and marsipantårta.

The massipantåta in the opening post was presented to me by
one of my clients, on this day, a year ago. Yes, he too came from county
Småland.

Have fun!
Claes in Lund, Sweden

3 Likes
#15

That princesstårta looks irresistable. Mmm…

#16

Not something that I could eat but would you happen to have the recipe?

#17

Of course:


1 Like
#18

It is always funny how as a german speaking person (with some english knowledge) I can understand some of the written things in swedish, and they always sound terribly cute…as if you are always speaking like small children in sweden…
:smiley:

1 Like
#19

Bork, bork, bork!

#20

I didn’t want to be racist against Swedes in any way, but most Americans of my generation think about that dude when they hear the word Sweden or the Swedish language.

:smile::sweat_smile::joy::rofl: