Trying sRGB instead of Adobe RGB


#1

Is there any noticeable improvement in terms of purple colour through the image? I can’t see any myself. It would be particularly noticeable in the cloudy bits.

Using sRGB calibration and profiling, and images are saved to sRGB output.

Thanks in advance.


#2

@Fotonut, If you watch images from other people on your own monitor, do those images appear desaturated to you? Can you see the difference between saturation of your pictures and pictures from other people?

Your picture has still much saturation. It is less purple (still little bit in clouds and roofs, roofs are more magenta) then your other pictures. But there is more cyan. I hope you can see the cyan in the gray pole and the white boats. Because if your image is desaturated, there is still cyan in the gray and white (pole, boats, curtains in the houses). But also, when your image is desaturated, it is more natural.


(David Oliver) #3

This does seem to be without the problematic purple that I’ve noticed in your other images.

My impression of the saturation is the same as @iarga’s. Here is a slightly desaturated version that looks more natural on my display while still being quite punchy.


(Pat David) #4

There is only a very slight cast of purple in the clouds, I think. Nothing unnatural looking (though the saturation does feel a bit high for my tastes). Looks like maybe you’ve gotten an sRGB workflow looking ok? :smiley:


(keith) #5

Looks fine on my laptop.
Am I the only one one sometimes likes slightly over saturated images, in this instance the image looks fine.
Looks like you’ve cracked it :grinning:


(Eric Mesa) #6

Hah, I was about to comment that I actually love the over-saturation in this image. Even if it isn’t what you saw with your eyes (and it might be), it really evokes the feeling of this area and contrasts well with fog. If I could suggest just two things:

  1. Using GIMP, Photoshop, or whatever you prefer - consider making a high contrast black and white version of this. Then mask that over the cloudy area of the photo. This gets rid of the purple cast - and any of the mountain deep in the clouds is essentially just black against white. I think it might look awesome combined with the punch of the lower 2/3 of the image.

  2. If there’s ONE thing that does work well with the saturation it’s the oompa loompa on the pier. You might want a normal or even desat version of the photo that you could mask over this person. Unless it’s former American Politician Boehner, no one is that orange.


#7

Thanks for all your comments. Like Keith and Eric, I love a little saturation and contrast in my photos, but I really don’t like colour casts at all!

Some days, particularly dark and gloomy days, I reckon nature just needs a boost, because what you’d otherwise have, no one would be interested in looking at.

Thanks again!


#8

If you’re like me and end up editing images late at night, it is worth noting that the lighting conditions at edit time can be a cause of unwanted colour casts. Under a fluorescent light, your eyes (well your brain to be pedantic :slight_smile: ) compensates very well, until you rest and view again under natural light.

P.S. I’ve enjoyed most of your images.


#9

You know what, I hadn’t considered that at all! Thanks @james, I’ll check it out.


(Mica) #10

This is a great and often overlooked tip! I calibrated my monitors with the shades drawn and the lights on, and I try and edit in the same conditions.