Old camera model

(Gustavo Adolfo) #42

Around USD 155 :open_mouth:

EDIT: Used: around USD 105

EDIT2:

Probably. Plus, there is the customs. If it falls under their radar, the tax will double the price, if not more. Please, let me know when you come to Rio :stuck_out_tongue:

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(Alessandro Amato Del Monte (Aadm)) #43

Having said that, and still asserting that the D600 is the best full frame on the market considering price/performance ratio, I am selling mine to get a D810 second hand.

The reason is simply that I’m considering this DSLR as likely the last one I’ll ever have; the camera that I’m more likely to pick it up when I go for a walk or a ride etc is the considerably smaller/lighter Fuji with a 35mm or 18mm lens. But I want to still have a DSLR for the pure pleasure of having the highest quality; or next time I go to Svalbard (I went there last September and it was tragic for my Fuji; had to swap batteries like crazy, they lasted about ten minutes or so).

So I want to have the latest & greatest iteration of the Nikon pro-level full frame cameras – without obviously spending the crazy amount of money for the new D850(*). So if anybody living in Europe wants my D600 with ~48k shutter actuations and with shutter mechanism replaced under warrany I’m giving it away for six hundred euros.

(*) D4 and D5 are on a different league.

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #44

You’re right, and I didn’t take attention to that.

I made the following test: put a 18% greycard on the floor, near a well lit glass wall (sunny day outside, but no direct sunlight into the scene), set up the dial to “P”, checked that the camera was accepting speed/aperture settings and shoot 0, +1/3, +2/3, +1 EV exposures.

In Darktable, the histogram for each raw are:

0EV:
image

+1/3 EV
image

+2/3 EV
image

+1 EV
image

It seems there’s a light metering issue with the camera, isn’t it?

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(Glenn Butcher) #45

To tease apart your assertion, what specific thing about these histograms say that to you? Right now, all I see is some clump of image data, moving as I would expect for EV compensation…

Post the raw, that’ll help…

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #46

I expected to see the histogram spike in the middle when there was no exposure compensation, since I’m aiming a 18% grey subject.

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #47

Here they go:

0EV
IMG_4236.CR2 (10.4 MB)

+1/3 EV
IMG_4237.CR2 (10.4 MB)

+2/3 EV
IMG_4238.CR2 (10.4 MB)

+1 EV
IMG_4239.CR2 (10.5 MB)

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(Glenn Butcher) #48

Out grocery shopping with wife, will look when we get home…

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #49

:slightly_smiling_face: Thanks!

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#50

Hi again!

Which metering mode do you use:
evaluative, center-weighted, partial, spot?

Have fun!
Claes in Lund, Sweden

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #51

I used evaluative for the grey card shots.

EDIT: Changed to spot and took a grey card shot again and the histogram is a bit more underexposed:
image

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #52

I’m sorry about this, but the previous histogram images are considering a base curve applied to the image.

Turning it off, the 0 EV histogram is like this:

image

and the +1 EV

image

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#53

Could you redo your raw files with spot metering (and the typical grey card shot considerations)?

Also, +2/3 EV and +1 EV have both “1/15” marked on the histogram… EXIF error?

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #54

Would the 0 EV be enough?
_MG_4250.CR2 (10.4 MB)

What would they be?

Don’t have a clue. On Digikam it shows the same way.

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(Mica) #55

Isn’t this ETTR?

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(Shreedhar Inamdar) #56

@gadolf, the camera metering works under the assumption that illumination of pixels in a typical normal photograph averages out to middle grey.
Therefore, if you take a photo of a grey card with camera suggested exposure, its histogram will be bunched in the middle. So your camera’s metering is working as expected.
If you take a photo of a white card, the output should be a grey card and the histogram will be the same!

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #57

… but it doesn’t, right?
Take a look at the last histogram I showed (with base curve turned off). I shot that one without any exposure compensation (0 EV), with the camera suggested exposure. Shouldn’t the histogram be in the middle?

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(Shreedhar Inamdar) #58

Every camera have certain tendencies. The manufacturer likes to give some signature so to speak. Your camera seem to be underexposing a stop. This does not mean malfunction. Once you know this, and if you don’t like it, then you can correct it manually.
Also, I think that you should apply the base curve to the photo for the histogram evaluation. Because the expected output is a jpeg for manufacturers. Thus the exposure is also computed with basic adjustments in mind.

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(Gustavo Adolfo) #59

If you say so, then, I’ll accept that.
In fact, my previous experience with digital cameras is almost non-existent. Before this one, there’s my powershot, and before that, a 4MP Nikon point and shoot.
The strange thing is that if I compensate, say, 2/3 stops, depending on the subject, the resulting image gets really overexposed. It’s like it’s not a constant deviation.

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(Alberto) #60

@gadolf this might help:

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#61

@gadolf

18% grey subject.

I really do not want to make things more complicated, but are you sure your grey subject is reflecting 18%???

https://www.photoequipmentstore.com.au/lastolite-ezybalance-30cm-12-grey-white/

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