Slides for the State of Libre Graphics 2018


(a.l.e) #1

Hi

on a very short notice I took over the collection of the slides for the state of libre graphics 2018 for the libre graphics meeting that is starting very soon.

a question to the g’mic developers and community: is somebody willing to prepare two image slides about the last and next year of g’mic?

a full description of the call is here:

you can send me the slides per email (the address is in the README of the github repository) or even better make a pull request.

if you have questions, don’t hesitate to ask!

ciao
a.l.e


(David Tschumperlé) #2

Hello @ale,
I’m really sorry to say that, but one should consider that the G’MIC project is currently paused for a few weeks. The reason is, the plug-in developer is currently in vacations, and I (core developer) am really busy with the writing of a 200-pages manuscript for a University degree.
The manuscript must be ready for the end of May, and I’ve still a lot of work to do on it :tired_face:

So, unfortunately, developers won’t be able to make some slides just right now.
But of course, if someone else want to help, that would be awesome :slight_smile:
Basically, all the needed material is here (images + news) : https://pixls.us/blog/2018/02/g-mic-2-2/

If someone is interested to make some beautiful slides, please let us know !


(a.l.e) #3

Good luck with your academic work!
And thanks for your reply.

The blog post is for sure a very good starting point!

If nobody volunteers i can try to create a few slides from it. But I’m not a G’MIC user so I’m not sure I’ll get it 100% right…


#4

Title slide?

Problem might be that it is not simple or abstract enough to be a slide. Thoughts?

PS The subtitle “A Full-Featured…” is kind of low-contrast.


#5

Using the subheadings from the blog post:

Slide 2

Slide 3

PS I won’t be doing the notes. One thing to make sure you include is an explanation of the dual licensing. See: https://pixls.us/blog/2018/02/g-mic-2-2/#1-2-cecill-c-a-more-permissive-license.


(a.l.e) #6

good start @afre … i try to change a few things (and make the slides a bit more visual…)


(a.l.e) #7

here’s my proposal, based on @afre 's work:

if they are fine for you’ll create the gmic-2.png too and a .txt based on the report linked above.


(a.l.e) #8

ok, i’ll also do the 2…


(a.l.e) #9

… and now some copy paste for the text…


(a.l.e) #10

and the text i’m proposing (mostly a copy paste from the announce linked above with a few rewordings to make it shorter):


G’MIC

– slide 0 –

G’MIC provides many ways of manipulating generic image data, i.e. still images or image sequences. More than 950 different image processing functions are already available in the G’MIC framework, this number being expandable through the use of the G’MIC scripting capabilities.

– slide 1 –

Port of the G’MIC-Qt plugin to Krita

The G’MIC-Qt plugin is now available for Krita versions 3.3+ and, not yet as feature complete as the GIMP counterpart, the feedback we’ve had so far is rather positive.

CeCILL-C, a more permissive license

The core files of G’MIC, (i.e. its C++ library libgmic) now als use the CeCILL-C license (in the spirit of the LGPL but conform to French law) It’s now possible to integrate libgmic and its image filtersin software that is not licensed under GPL/CeCILL licenses.

Improving the lineart colorization filter

From the analysis of the contours and the geometry of a lineart, the colorization filter tries to automatically generate a colorization layer.

Color equalizer in HSI, HSL and HSV spaces

The artist can draw or paint digitally using only grayscale, then colorize his masterpiece afterwards by re-assigning specific colors to the different gray values of the image.

G’MIC can ensure that the pixel brightness remains unchanged during the color transformation.

Angular deformations

A random local deformation filter with the ability to generate angular deformations (giving a crispy look to the edges of comics, and improving the rendering of David Revoy’s alien death ray).

Bring out the details without creating “halos”

The challenge of the detail enhancement algorithms is to analyze the geometry of the local image structures in a more fine way, to take into account geometry-adaptive local weights for each pixel of a given neighborhood. To make it simple: we created anisotropic versions of the usual enhancement methods, orienting them by the edges detected in the images.

Different types of image deformations

New filters to apply geometric deformations on images are added to G’MIC on a regular basis. Among others, G’MIC 2.2 adds the Deformations/Spherize filter which allows to locally distort an image to give the impression that it is projected on a 3D sphere or ellipsoid.

– slide 2 –

Artistic Abstractions

Effects that turn an image into a more abstract version (simplification and re-rendering). These filters have in common the analysis of the local image geometry, followed by a step of image synthesis.

For example, the Contours/Super-pixels filter locally gathers the image pixels with the same color to form a partitioned image, like a puzzle, with geometric shapes that stick to the contours. This partition is obtained using the SLIC method (Simple Linear Iterative Clustering).

Improvements in the G’MIC core

  • Better performances for the analysis of the language syntax.
  • Optimizations and new features in the mathematical expression evaluator, opening to even more possibilities for performing non-trivial operations at the pixel level.
  • A better support of raw video input/outputs (.yuv format).

A better G’MIC-Qt plugin

The G’MIC Qt plug in used by Gimp and Krita now has:

  • The ability to set a timeout when previewing computationnaly intensive filters.
  • A better management of the input-output parameters for each filter (persistence, better menus, a reset button).
  • a better preview area is now easier (maximisation, zoom levels)

New design for G’MIC Online

G’MIC Online is a web service allowing you to apply a subset of G’MIC filters on your images, directly inside a web browser. These web pages now have a responsive design (smartphones, tablets).

Image sources:

G’MIC core / binaries: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/8192314996/


please provide corrections to the text in a way that easily diffable or easy to put in the txt file on github.

i can provide the gimp xcf files.

any feedback?

p.s.: for the current text please refer to https://github.com/libregraphicsmeeting/state-of-lg-2018/edit/master/gmic/gmic.txt


(a.l.e) #11

p.s.: it was nice to discover G’MIC… i’ve heard the name in the past, but exactly new what it does : - )


#12

@ale Glad I could help. Nice touches! Also refer to this post: Release of G’MIC 2.2.0. On some points, it is clearer than the blog post, which you may want to add or replace. E.g., statement on G’MIC

G’MIC (GREYC’s Magic for Image Computing) is a full-featured open-source framework for image processing. It provides several different user interfaces to convert/manipulate/filter/visualize generic image datasets, ranging from 1d scalar signals to 3d+t sequences of multi-spectral volumetric images, thus including 2d color images.

and on the new licensing:

Most source files of the G’MIC core are now dual-licensed CeCILL-C (LGPL-like) or CeCILL (GPL-compatible). This means using the G’MIC library is now allowed in closed-source software as long as modifications done on the source code is given back to the community. Note that this licensing change does not concern the code of the GTK or Qt plug-in, but only the core functionalities (the G’MIC script interpreter and the implementation of the filters).


(David Tschumperlé) #13

hello, just to thank you for your efforts ! Things are looking really nice, thank you !


(David Tschumperlé) #14

hello, just to thank you for your efforts ! Things are looking really nice, thank you !


(a.l.e) #15

@afre i started from the formulations you quoted and tried to shorten them.

if you have suggestions that are shorter than the ones i’ve put in the .txt they are very welcome.
on the other side, if the current text is somehow ok, i would prefer not to replace it with a longer one (as an example, i don’t see a need for saying what G’MIC stands for or that ti’s open source… when presenting it at the LGM) .

in its current state, the text is too long… but i have not the time to make it shorter : - )


#16

I have started to reword and shorten the text to make it easier to read and understand. Integrate the changes where you see fit :slight_smile:. It is a WIP: I will continue as I find the time.


G’MIC

– slide 0 –

G’MIC provides many different user interfaces to convert, manipulate, filter and visualize generic image datasets. It has more than 950 image processing functions. Due to its scripting capabilities, many more can be added.

– slide 1 –

Port of the G’MIC-Qt plugin to Krita

The G’MIC-Qt plugin is now available for Krita 3.3+. Although it is not feature complete yet, we’ve received positive feedback.

CeCILL-C, a more permissive license

The G’MIC core is now dual-licensed CeCILL-C (LGPL-compatible) or CeCILL (GPL-compatible). It’s now possible to integrate libgmic and gmic_stdlib in closed-source software as long as modifications are given back to the community. This change does not affect the plugin or community filters.

Improving the lineart colorization filter

The filter has two new features: “Autoclean” helps keep colors within the contours and hatching detection limits the number of small colored areas generated.

TBC…


(a.l.e) #17

i’ve integrated your changes in

as long as it’s shorter, i accept everything…

on top of it, it’s G’MIC’s slides not mines… i only wanted to help making the slides a bit more visual appealing. and after having skimmed through the blog post i’ve thought that it would not be that hard to pick from there the reader notes : - )


#18

Made some progress and a few edits. Still not done; maybe later :slight_smile:.


G’MIC

– slide 0 –

G’MIC provides many different user interfaces to convert, manipulate, filter and visualize generic image datasets. It has more than 950 image processing functions. Due to its scripting capabilities, many more can be added.

– slide 1 –

Port of the G’MIC-Qt plugin to Krita

The G’MIC-Qt plugin is now available for Krita 3.3+. Although it is not feature complete yet, we’ve received positive feedback.

CeCILL-C, a more permissive license

The G’MIC core is now dual-licensed CeCILL-C (LGPL-compatible) or CeCILL (GPL-compatible). It’s now possible to integrate libgmic and gmic_stdlib in closed-source software as long as modifications are given back to the community. This change does not affect the plugin or community filters.

Improving the lineart colorization filter

The filter has two new features: “Autoclean” helps keep colors within the contour boundaries and hatching detection limits the number of small colored areas generated.

Color equalizer in HSI, HSL and HSV spaces

This new filter allows the user to modify the hue and saturation for various brightness levels / ranges in an image while maintaining brightness. E.g., a digital artist would be able to quickly colorize his or her grayscale artwork.

Angular deformations

Crease is a new local deformation filter that makes images “crispy”; e.g., make comic panels jagged or improve David Revoy’s alien death ray.

Bring out the details without creating “halos”

Magic details and Equalize local histograms are filters that consider the geometric content of the image (anisotropy) for local enhancement, allowing more detail and color to come through while reducing halos that typically arise from enhancement.


TBC…


#19

Done! Maybe place the plugin items together :wink:. Hint: copy-paste the entire text because I edited the whole thing.


G’MIC

– SLIDE 0 –

G’MIC provides many different user interfaces to convert, manipulate, filter and visualize generic image datasets. It has more than 950 image processing functions. Due to its scripting capabilities, many more can be added.

– SLIDE 1 –

G’MIC-Qt plugin for Krita

The G’MIC-Qt plugin is now available for Krita 3.3+. Although it is not feature complete yet, we’ve received positive feedback.

CeCILL-C, a more permissive license

The G’MIC core is now dual-licensed CeCILL-C (LGPL-compatible) or CeCILL (GPL-compatible). It’s now possible to integrate libgmic and gmic_stdlib in closed-source software as long as modifications are given back to the community. This change does not affect the plugin or community filters.

Improving the lineart colorization filter

The filter has two new features: “Autoclean” helps keep colors within the contour boundaries and hatching detection limits the number of small colored areas generated.

Color equalizer in HSI, HSL and HSV spaces

This new filter allows the user to modify the hue and saturation for various brightness ranges in an image while maintaining brightness. E.g., a digital artist would be able to quickly colorize his or her grayscale artwork.

Angular deformations

Crease is a new local deformation filter that makes images “crispy”; e.g., make comic panels jagged or improve David Revoy’s alien death ray.

Detail enhancement without the “halos”

Magic details and Equalize local histograms are filters that consider the geometric content of the image (anisotropy) for local enhancement, allowing more detail and color to come through while reducing halos that typically arise from enhancement.

Image deformations

Filters that apply geometric deformations are added regularly; e.g., we could add a local spherical or ellipsoidal deformation using Spherize.

– SLIDE 2 –

Artistic abstractions

An example of this is the new Super-pixels filter that partitions an image, based on similar colors, into geometric shapes that align to the contours. This is achieved by using the SLIC method (Simple Linear Iterative Clustering).

G’MIC core and interpreter

  • Syntax improvements making scripts easier to write, read and execute with a lower memory footprint.
  • The math expression evaluator has received many optimizations and features making it more robust and capable.
  • Support for .yuv video files now extends to more sampling modes (4:2:0, 4:2:2 or 4:4:4).

A better G’MIC-Qt plugin

  • The ability to set a timeout for previewing computationally intensive filters.
  • Better management of filter parameters via menus, persistent values and a reset button.
  • Preview area is cleaner and easier to zoom and maximize.
  • Language support independent from the system defaults.

G’MIC Online redesign

The web service is now responsive, allowing us to apply a selection of G’MIC filters from our favorite mobile devices.


(a.l.e) #20

ok, i’ve put it on github!

… without really reading through it…

only one thing: i’ve added again the explaination what G’MIC online is… i think that people who do not know about the service will otherwise think that you have made your website responsive… (afaik is not common for c++ project to offer a webservice… not common but cool!)

and the “image source” is for minimal compliance with the cc-by-sa for one picture i’ve taken from flickr.

you can check it here: